UPDATE:  WeaponizedChess has been launched on Steam!  No reports of installation or execute failure so I call that a win. 

Click here to go to the store page on Steam where you can buy WeaponizedChess

Here is a clickable link you can use to see a hi-definition version of the 5 minutes long trailer for the Steam version:

High definition 5 minute long trailer

Here is a clickable link you can use to see the hi-definition, 10 minute long version of the trailer for the Steam version (or go to YouTube yourself and search for "WeaponizedChess"):

Trailer for WeaponizedChess on Steam 

Let me take a moment to respond to a couple of the comments about the game I have seen on SteamWorks.  I am going to greatly reduce my previous responses and responses in the future.

The trailer is overlong:   Trailer length reduced to 5 minutes on 9/3/16.

$20 cost of the game:  There are many options you can set in the game.  Each change to an option usually creates a profound change to game play.  Each such change is essentially a new type of game.  Since WeaponizedChess has very large number of such sub-games the cost per game is very low.  At the very bottom of this webpage are my calculations for an estimate of the number of such games.  What I came up with is a lower bound.  It is not the exact number of games.  The actual number of sub-games is more than the estimate.  There are an estimated 89587078766765604864000 sub-games.  The price per sub-game is 2.2324648013212661794517927186586e-22 dollars.  This is NOT $2.00 per game.  Notice the e raised to -22.

Just how cheap does the game have to be per sub-game before you think it is worthwhile?  If your counter argument is "I only want one game" then assuming you do really want a type of chess, a different type of chess, then the accessibility to all these sub-games increases the likelihood that you can fine-tune the game to get the exact type of chess that you really like.  What is a fair price for a game that you really like? 

"There are too many options" is one complaint (viz. "interface is bloated"):  This complaint is without substance.  The longer lists of options only are shown when the user specifically causes them to be shown.  They are not visible in normal game use.  The options are needed to configure all the various sub-games.  As a lowest priority activity I will consider adding an option to permit the user to inhibit a long list being displayed (primarily to cut down on the list being displayed due to a mis-click).  Reiterating: there is nothing undesirable about a flat interface.  It is a logical impossibility to provide an enormous number of sub-games and permit them to be controlled without there existing numerous "widgets" to support that control (assuming the use of a graphical user interface).  The widgets must be displayed at some point.

Re-translation of the foreign language store pages on Steam for WeaponizedChess is complete.  The translations for all 26 languages have been improved.  At some time in the future I will investigate the availability of non-statistical translators (translators that are actually parsers) so maybe I can avoid this sort of problem in the future.

There are also two new videos about the two graphical user interfaces available for you to use to play the game.  Here are links for those:

GUI for Ubuntu 12+ and SteamOS Steam Console Desktop Mode

GUI for Ubuntu 15+ and SteamOS Steam Console Big Picture Mode

UPDATE:7/23/2016  On July 29 2016 on the Steam software download service a version of WeaponizedChess will become available to buy.  The Steam release will occur sometime Friday afternoon U.S time.  This version only runs on Linux (there presently does NOT exist a Windows version).  It is tested to run on Ubuntu 12.04, Ubuntu 15.10, and SteamOS.  On SteamOS it has been tested to run both in Big Picture Mode (that's the single window screen you see when you boot a Steam console) and on the desktop.  Restating: WeaponizedChess will run a Steam console under both the mode you normally boot to when you press the On button and under the mode you see when you switch to desktop mode.  The specific type of Steam console on which Steam WeaponizedChess was tested was an Alienware Steam Machine.

Probably the other most important piece of information you need to know is that you basically MUST have hardware acceleration installed for the game to be playable.  If you don't have hardware acceleration then you should set to the simple piece set and toggle on See Big Board Only.  If you don't have hardware acceleration installed and you try to run it on something like an i3 laptop then assuming the normal piece set in use when the game starts then whenever you click on a game piece there is a delay of over 40 seconds before the game board updates.  This delay can be dropped from 40 seconds to more like 14 if you switch to the simple piece set (but that's not the piece set you normally see when you start the game).  To switch to the simple piece set go to View->Select Shape of Pieces.  To further speed up the draw speed select View->See Big Board Only.  If you do that then the i3 non-accelerated draw of the complex piece set should drop down to about 10 seconds (instead of 40) and a non-accelerated draw of the simple set will drop down to about 2 seconds (instead of 14).  See!  See! I told you the simple piece set was a good idea.  I realize that the simple set may not provide an aesthetic response spike that will appease the effetely jaded visual sensitivities of some people.

In point of fact, you CAN play the game without hardware acceleration and still see the 3 additional views of the board and the draw of the presently selected piece but you must be a very patient and determined individual.  Presumably you will spend a lot of time thinking between moves so optimistically the 40 second delay won't matter to you (yeah right..).  Steam normally will set up hardware acceleration for you and most games don't run well if not accelerated.  fglrx is what you want on Ubuntu in my experience to get hardware acceleration.  Steam consoles are guaranteed to be hardware accelerated in both Big Picture and desktop mode.  That is one of the two big reasons they exist, why they were invented.  All games on them will always be hardware accelerated (so is WeaponizedChess).  The other existential justification for Steam consoles is uniformity of OS installation (you don't run the risk of accidentally misinstalling Steam itself or misinstalling hardware acceleration).

There are two GUIs for the game.  One is for SteamOS Big Picture and Ubuntu 15+ and the other is for SteamOS desktop and Ubuntu 12.04+.

This Steam version DOES have an AI.  It will play a game with you.  It will run faster if your chip is equivalent to an i7.  It does NOT support online multiplayer.  You cannot play against another human using the Internet to communicate your moves.  However, you can play against one of your friends using this Steam version but you and your friend must be in the same physical room.  You share the computer, the keyboard, the mouse, and the screen while you play a game against each other. 

In this Steam version there 13 piece sets. In all the YouTube videos except the last one you only see 2 piece sets.   To see the new trailer video for the release use one of the links below to go to YouTube (or just go there yourself) and search for and find all the WeaponizedChess videos.  The trailer is the very last video added.  Most of the behavior of the game is the same as described in the previous YouTube videos.

The Steam version is playable in 26 languages.  The language translation does not use, rely, or care about what locale you have your computer display language set to.  You can set the game to your language so that it will boot into that language but you yourself must do that.  I will describe in the Steam store page for each foreign language how to start in English and what you click to set to the specific foreign language (the instructions will be IN that foreign language).  The exact languages you in which can cause the game commands to display are:

English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Arabic, Czech, Dutch, Greek, Japanese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Simplified Chinese, Thai, Turkish, Bulgarian, Danish, Finnish, Hungarian, Korean, Polish, Russian, Swedish, Traditional Chinese, and Ukrainian.

Steam is easy to get and install.  It is free to have on your computer but many games (like THIS game) cost money to buy.  To get Steam just search for "Download Steam" and follow the instructions.  It isn't complicated or hard to do.  There are free games on Steam!

It occurs to me that maybe you don't already have Linux.  You may have no idea what Linux is. Personally, I have always considered Linux to be the Anti-Windows choice.  If you don't want to constantly be giving money to Microsoft over the years then perhaps Linux is for you.  Linux is free.  Ubuntu, the type of Linux on which WeaponizedChess was developed and tested, is free.  You need at least 25 gigabytes of disk space and you need about 45 minutes of time but that is all you need.  If you already have a Windows computer then you can add Ubuntu to that computer without losing your ability to boot to Windows (this is basically what Linux was designed to do, i.e. add it non-destructively to a Windows system).  WeaponizedChess is strictly a 64 bit application so you can't run it on non-64 bit computers like Pentiums or earlier chips.  You can run it on Celerons, i3's, i5's, and i7's.  I am not familiar with non-Intel chips so I can't name the compatible AMD chips.  At the bottom of the web page I have added instructions on how to install Ubuntu and OpenSUSE.  The instructions are for Ubuntu 14.04 but I point out that the development and test of WeaponizedChess occurred on Ubuntu 12.04.  Note 12.04 is due to be phased out in about 1 year...but if you want the best chance for compatibility get 12.04 and not 14.04.  WeaponizedChess is tested to run on Ubuntu 15.10 but to run there the Big Picture GUI had to be used.

NOW I can start on fixing the Google version.  And I have indeed started working on that. 

I hope you enjoy the game.  I have worked very hard for a very long time to create what you see.  It isn't perfect and there is room for improvement in many areas but it's present form is adequate to the task of being the first major release on a desktop.

UPDATE:6/17/16: Google has STILL not bothered to fix the problem affecting the paid version of this game.  This is a reported Google bug and it affects many other apps.  In other news, there should be a version of

WeaponizedChess available on Steam soon.  There is a new video on YouTube showing this version.  After the Steam version is available then work will restart on the Android version. The hope all along was that Google

would do what they should, i.e. fix a problem that THEY alone caused.  Unfortunately, it was not really possible to work on the new Steam version and attempt to fix the Android version.  Have no fear, everything will be

converted into a hunky dory state eventually.  Note the free version does not work properly on a cell phone, it was only hardware tested on Nexus 7, Nexus 9, and Nexus 10.  The support website remains disabled due to

spammer, hacker activity, and because when run on the hardware tested the game does not crash (much).

 

UPDATE: 12/27/15:Do not buy the paid app at this time. It insists on going into hibernation when you try to use it.  Despite Google's claim otherwise this issue has not been fixed.  There is no timeline for when a fix will actually occur.  Get the free version instead, it does not seem to be affected by this problem.  Going to 6.0.1 (which isn't available on a Nexus 10 where this problem happens too) does not fix the problem.

UPDATE: As of 12/9/15 Google claims in a post that updating to 6.0.1 fixes this problem.  If this is accurate then you can buy WeaponizedChess and run it on 6.0.1

WARNING:As of 12/8/15 the paid version of WeaponizedChess is non-functional and there is no estimate of when this problem will be fixed.  The free version does not seem

to be affected by this problem. It is not technically possible to suspend sales. Do not buy at this time. It doesn't crash, it just insists on suspending itself.  I am working with Google

to determine and fix the problem.  The problem seems to have occurred as a result of a security update of Android by Google.  It is not associated with any particular version of Android.

WeaponizedChess is now available on Android.

If you have a mobile device that has Android then you can go to Google Play Store and get WeaponizedChess there.

You will find it by searching for "Weaponized Chess". Two versions are available. WeaponizedChess and WeaponizedChessFree are their names. Obviously, one of these versions is free. However, the free version is very restricted. The paid version costs $1.50 US dollars (except in a few discounted markets). Note that neither of these games has an AI. These game programs will not play a game with you. Instead, 2 human beings use the game program on a single mobile device to play a game of WeaponizedChess. You and your friend will share the device to play the game while you are both in the same physical room. A future version will provide the ability to use WiFi so that each player can use their personal device to play but that version is not available yet.

Both of these versions should run on virtually any Android device. The game programs have been hardware tested to run on Google 7, 9, and 10 tablets. The game programs have been emulator tested to run on Google 5, 4, S, One, and Android Wear (Round and Square) devices. The advantage of these versions of WeapnizedChess is that they will run on low-cost, low-end mobile devices that do not have WiFi and only have limited memory. The only permission required is a touch screen but the game provides a way to select game pieces without using the touch screen.  You do need Jelly Bean (4.2.x) or above.

These games have been translated into 48 to 50 languages.

If you set your tablet to display in one of these languages then you will be able to read the game commands in that language and use the game via that language.  In the game there is language-specific documentation in all of these languages except for Malay, Marathi, Thai, Russian, Simplified Chinese, and Punjabi.  All language translation was done using a computer translator and the results have not been checked by a native speaker of that language.

In the paid version, if you set your device under Settings to the language then the game commands can be read and used in that language in the following 48 languages:

Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Traditional Chinese, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, Urdu, and Punjabi. These languages were selected because Google Play maintains a market for most of these languages and because of their larger speaking population (larger than other language populations).

In the free version, if you set your device under Settings to the language then the game commands can be read and used in that language in the following 50 languages:

Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, Urdu, and Punjabi. These languages were selected because Google Play supports distribution of free apps for most of these languages and because of their larger speaking population (larger than other language populations).

The free version WeaponizedChessFree is very restricted and there may or may not be advertising displayed during game play. Movement is restricted to Move Only. There are many other restrictions too. The general move type is restricted to Weaponized Chess which means that if you would like see what regular chess would be like if you added weapons, 3-D, and stealth then you don't get that in the free version but you do in the paid version.

The Linux version of WeaponizedChess is alive and well and not for sale! The powers that be in the land of software-protection and sell-your-Linux-software-online have been noticeably disinterested and unhelpful in the seemingly endless quest to make this product for sale on Linux.  Recently WeaponizedChess has recently been accepted into the Greenlight program at Steam.  The Linux version _HAS_ an AI. But you can't have it. Not yet anyway.

A forum website is open for users to log in and do user-ish sort of activities like leave bug reports. You can reach the site at www.chessofmassdestruction.com.  If you want bugs stomped at maximum speed then you will act so as to be helpful on this site and not otherwise. Trolls and hackers will receive what they deserve. Very little time is available for moderation.  Due to repeated hacking and spamming attempts if you want a new topic or to post then you should 1)be on-topic, 2)post in English, and 3)post to pre-existing topics.  Any reference to other web-sites, to URLs, etc. even in a requested post is VERY likely to get you banned.  If you want to advertise a product then go pay for your own website or pay for your own advertising.  If you want a new topic (something directly related to WeaponizedChess and particularly to a bug in WeaponizedChess) then it's fine if you ask for that. In English. YOU expend the time to use Google Translator to translate.  There are no known major bugs.  There is an update pending which fixes a known bug re game state retention across tablet orientation changes.

 


 

There is a new video on YouTube showing what the game looks like. The following clickable link will take you there (or you can search for Weaponized Chess on YouTube yourself):

WeaponizedChess on Android


WeaponizedChess is a game created by modifying regular chess.

Arguably the most important modification is to add weapons (along with other types of objects that your pieces can pick up and use).

chess + weapons = WeaponizedChess

WeaponizedChess is also an attempt to modernize chess.

Regular chess is about pawns contending with horsemen (knights) in an effort to destroy castles and capture the enemy king. Modern conflict is not like THAT at all.

WeaponizedChess pawns are more maneuverable and powerful. Horsemen (knights) are replaced by choppers (air cavalry) which truly fly through 3D space. Submarines use the subterranean level to attack and cannot normally be seen.

WeaponizedChess is three-dimensional but use of the 2 new dimensions (air and sub) are limited by the game design and in a standard game. This type of three-dimensionality is often referred to as "2.5D". Some weapons are specifically designed to destroy pieces using the air and sub level. SAM launchers fire SAMs which home in on and destroy air pieces and torpedo launchers fire torpedoes which seek out and destroy pieces in the sub level. It can be hazardous to your health to fly!

Modern conflict is heavily dependent on military technology. In WeaponizedChess there are choppers, jets, tanks, submarines, destroyers, and combat engineers whose movements and characteristics have been translated to a chess-like board. Low-observable assets play a deadly game of cat and mouse with the opponent. Infantrymen use jump-packs to fly over the battlefield. Combat scuba invisibly travels under the surface to attack.

Human beings are usually more able to accomplish their task when they are able to use a physical object or tool to help them. Similarly, a soldier is more effective when armed. Each combatant piece in a WeaponizedChess game has many more potential courses of action than a piece on a regular chess board. Comparatively, the soldiers in a regular chess game are eternally disarmed.

Projectile weapons, area-of-effect weapons, non-lethal stunning weapons, and conversion weapons are used against the enemy. Lese-majeste has been replaced with decapitation strikes. Ambushes can occur and reinforcements can arrive. Fratricide is always a possibility. Logistics is critical. All of these concepts inherent to modern war have been translated into a type of chess.

Sometimes pieces in WeaponizedChess cannot be seen by the opposing side. This limited visibility of pieces (stealth) is tunable. That is, if you hate stealth you can turn it OFF and everything will always be visible. Alternatively, you can turn the stealth-tuning 'dial' and stealth/low-visibility becomes more or less applicable. In modern warfare it is critical to not be seen because anything that can be seen can be destroyed. WeaponizedChess attempts to mimic this nature.

WeaponizedChess uses a 10x10 board, not a 8x8 board. 8x8 is too small, let's make it a little bigger. The WeaponizedChess board rotates the regular chess board by 90 degrees (the color of the square in the lower right is black, not white). Black moves first. White got to move 1st in regular chess all this time, let Black move 1st now.

WeaponizedChess is an attempt to provide a game for people who used to play chess in the past but got bored with it.

Whenever regular chess does things one way, WeaponizedChess tries to do things the other way (if there's a clear, definite alternative choice). Did you ever look at your present position during a regular chess game and wish you could move TWO pieces instead of just one? In WeaponizedChess there is often a way to move more than 1 of your pieces during your turn. Rarely, you are even able to move one of your opponent's pieces!

WeaponizedChess is also an experiment in creating a game where a human player will always have an advantage over any conceivable artificial-intelligence player.

This is achieved by deliberately and radically increasing the exponential burden of a computer player but in a way that any human can naturally handle. Humans will always be better guessers than computers and stealth (and other features of the game) ensheathe this nature into the game. You don't like playing chess by mail or email remotely with someone because you fear they may cheat (get advice from a chess-playing computer program)? Play this game instead. Tired of playing chess against people who have spent a lot of time building up book knowledge about chess? Play this game instead.

Linux, non-Android Version of WeaponizedChess:

There is a Linux version of WeaponizedChess that DOES have an AI, it WILL play a game with you but to date it has not been possible to make it available for sale.  The following few paragraphs describe that non-Android Linux version.

WeaponizedChess is fully internationalized. It has been translated into over 40 languages. Both the game controls and in-game user documentation are presented in the selected language. The languages into which WeaponizedChess has been translated are: Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, German, Spanish, Dutch, French, Danish, Italian, Greek, Turkish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Polish, Czech, Portuguese, Romanian, Hungarian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Estonian, Latvian, Ukrainian, Russian, Hindi, Afrikaans, Swahili, Vietnamese, Korean, Indonesian, Filipino, Belarussian, Slovenian, Macedonian, Georgian, Croatian, Albanian, Tamil, and Serbian.

A recent test run displayed Bengali, Telugu, and Kannada properly although recently those three languages had experienced a period during test of displaying improperly (after 1st displaying properly for a long period). They're back! If not then presumably these languages should display properly if the proper fonts are loaded.

Translations of the game documentation into Herbrew, Aramaic, Urdu, and Farsi are provided within the installed game directory but those languages do not display properly in the game. If you are willing and able to read a word backwards in these languages then you will be able to play the game in these languages. The solution to this problem should occur at the system level, hence I'm not going to try to correct this problem myself (it's their responsibility, not mine). The translations in these languages look correct re right-to-left as viewed within emacs. It is doubtful that loading proper fonts will correct this issue. Restating for clarity: The documentation in these languages is displayed correctly in the game but the commands you click to control the game are in reverse (each command is 1 to 3 words long so it is not impossible to read them backwards. inconvenient but possible.).

Features common to Android and non-Android version:

WeaponizedChess has a fully developed board editor, game notation, and undo ability. Curious about what would have happened if you had done something different? In non-competitive mode, you can selectively take back movements and actions. WeaponizedChess has an extensive ability to modify game play to match user preferences. A user can save those preferences so that whenever the game starts those preferences decide how the game is to be played.

There are numerous videos about the game that you can watch on YouTube.

Just search for "WeaponizedChess" or "Weaponized Chess" and you will see them there.

Below are clickable links that take you to those videos.

 


 

 

The first video shows you what it looks like to play a simple game.

 

Click on the link below and you will be taken to YouTube where you can watch the video. Note that this video does NOT show the game as it looks in the Android version. Instead it shows the old graphics from the old, original Linux version.  The graphics in the present Linux version have been significantly improved and there are now 13 piece sets you can use instead of the original two (this video only shows the simpler, faster-to-draw piece set).

 

Fool's Mate in Weaponized Chess

 


 

 

The second video is a short slideshow that describes the game. Again..click on the link below and you can watch it on YouTube.

 

Short, Sweet, and Simple: Rapid Slideshow about Basic Concepts of WeaponizedChess

 


 

 

The third video is a somewhat longer demonstration of what you actually do when you play a game. Note that on YouTube there is a more detailed description of the video that you can read about each video.  This video does NOT show what the game looks like on Android.  It shows what the game looked like about a year ago under Linux.  The present Linux version has better graphics and there are 12 more piece sets you can use in addition to the simple one you see in this video.

 

WeaponizedChess: A Longer Game

 


 

 

The fourth and fifth videos (Part 1 and Part 2) describe the game in more detail. No time is devoted during these videos describing how WeaponizedChess is more like modern warfare than regular chess (two of the later videos DO talk about that).

 

Part 1: Detailed Description of Weaponized Chess:Relation to Chess, How the Game Functions

 

Part 2: Detailed Description of Weaponized Chess:Relation to Chess, How the Game Functions

 

 


 

 

The sixth and seventh videos talk more about the various ways the user can control the program. Here is where the board editor and all the various options you can use to control the game are shown to you.

 

Part 1:WeaponizedChess Interface

 

Part 2:WeaponizedChess Interface

 


 

 

The eight and ninth videos describe the game in detail AND spend a significant amount of time making the case that WeaponizedChess is a more faithful analog of modern conflict than regular chess.

 

Part 1: WeaponizedChess Detailed Game Description:Concept,Design,Relation to Chess

 

Part 2: WeaponizedChess Detailed Game Description:Concept,Design,Relation to Chess

 


 

 

The tenth video describes the various scenarios (pre-built starting game boards) that are available when you play the game. The use of the phrase "Deep Blue" is intended to be humorous and falls under fair use.

 

Deep Blue DIS buddy!: Scenarios for WeaponizedChess

 


Instructions

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR INSTALLING Ubuntu

 

I assume that you have a PC which already has Windows on it and that you want to keep your Windows.

 

In this document I will 1st provide a simplified list of actions. This list is intended to quickly give you a general idea of what you must do. Subsequently, I provide an exact list of instructions. These instructions attempt to provide a click-by-click set of instructions that guide you to do exactly what should be done.

 

Simplified List of Actions that You Must Take To Install Ubuntu (these simple instructions are not click-by-click)

First, get Ubuntu by downloading an .iso file from a public download site.

You burn your .iso file (which is an .iso image) onto a writeable DVD.

You boot that disc on the computer onto which you want to put Linux.

You answer a series of questions and make a number of selections.

You eject that boot disc. You reboot.

Select Ubuntu

Enter your username and password.

Then you follow the instructions in the email you receive when you buy the game. These instructions tell you how to install the game.

 

Exact Instructions on Installing Ubuntu as of September 14, 2014 (click-by-click)

 

Type in "Ubuntu" in your favorite browser. If you're using a Google toolbar make sure you're looking on the Web.

 

Click on www.ubuntu.com or just enter that as a web address in your toolbar.

 

Move your cursor over Download. Select Desktop in the drop down list that appears.

 

Click Download

 

Click not now, take me to the download

 

It will ask if you want to Open or Save ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso. Click Save.

 

A 6 megabit Internet connection will take 23 minutes to download this file.

 

The type of DVD you use to record the .iso needs to have a capacity to store a file as large as this .iso (It is a 1 gig file that is much smaller than openSUSE). I use a DVD+R double layer DVD that has 8.5 gigs of capacity.

 

When you insert your blank DVD in Windows it will ask if you want to burn it. It will offer to burn files to disc or to burn a DVD video disc. We will do neither. Hit the red X to cancel. If you burn your .iso file here and now you will get a disc that will not boot and which is useless for the purpose of installing Ubuntu.

 

Click the Windows icon in the lower left. Click Computer. Go to the location of your downloads. If you haven't changed where that goes then under Computer it is in Downloads. When you have the directory of the downloads opened RIGHT click on ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64

 

Select Burn Disc Image.

 

Select Verify if you want then click Burn.

 

Depending on the speed of your DVD drive, it should finish burning the disc in 5 minutes.

 

BEFORE YOU BOOT THAT DISC:

 

Back up your Windows system if possible. Don't leave your backup file on the Windows partition. Put it somewhere else. Somewhere online might be a good place to put your backup. In Windows determine the name/identifier of your Windows partition(s). In this document I will not try to tell you how to do these 2 things (out of scope).

 

If you are installing Ubuntu to an i3-base laptop (even though I have elsewhere on this website recommended against that) my recommendation now is to not to try to install Ubuntu wirelessly. Instead, if you have a WiFi router that normally connects to your laptop under Windows (or any other OS) turn that off. If you have a WiFi router that you insert between your laptop and your real telephone company router then you may need to unpower that WiFi router and move your Internet connection cable from that WiFi router into the real router. All of my attempts to install Ubuntu and openSUSE wirelessly all ended in disaster. Use your wired link for all your communication needs during installation of either Ubuntu or openSUSE on an i3-based laptop. If your laptop is connected to a dock then I recommend physically disconnecting the cable that communicates with your dock for the duration of the Linux install.

 

AFTER YOU HAVE BACKED UP YOUR WINDOWS:

 

Now that you have a boot disc here is what you do:

 

Put that boot disc in the DVD drive of the computer on which you want Ubuntu, however you decide to do that.

 

Boot your computer.

 

Click Install Ubuntu

 

Click Continue.

 

You'll have to decide for yourself what you do at the next screen. Pick the option that says it will install Ubuntu and leave everything else alone. If you already have an Ubuntu on there then be careful. You don't want to Reinstall. You want the option that totally erases the old Ubuntu. If you presently have 1 Linux that is not Ubuntu and you want your game on Ubuntu then choose whichever one erases that old Linux and replaces it with Ubuntu. A word of caution: this is the point of no return. All ye who pass through here are making irrevocable changes to their system, to the partitions.

 

On the next screen, click on the world map on your location then click Continue.

 

Click Continue

 

Type your name

 

Type your username

 

Double enter your good password. Note that this username and password are effectively the root password. Note that Ubuntu follows the same odiferous practice that Windows does of blending user with superuser. This is a bad idea. It significantly reduces the security of your system, inherently.

 

Click Continue.

 

Click Restart Now.

 

Ubuntu ejects the boot disc and politely asks you ro remove it. Please do so. Hit enter.

 

Enter your password.

 

Hit x to close the window telling you about Keyboard Shortcuts. It may not respond to your click very quickly. Wait. The reason it froze up here is because it's busy figuring out which updates your system needs. We will NOT install those updates at this time when it comes back. Wait a few minutes until it decides to respond to the mouse. Don't press any buttons.

 

At the top left under the words "Ubuntu Desktop" there is a column of differently colored square icons. Click on the top one.

 

Click in the search field. Type in the 3 letters: ter

 

Click Terminal. Don't select either of the XTerms. Terminal lets you use your mouse to copy and paste text from your screen that you have selected. The XTerms won't do that so we don't want'em.

 


INSTRUCTIONS FOR INSTALLING OpenSUSE

 

I assume that you have a PC which already has Windows on it and that you want to keep your Windows.

 

In this document I will 1st provide a simplified list of actions. This list is intended to quickly give you a general idea of what you must do. Subsequently, I provide an exact list of instructions. These instructions attempt to provide a click-by-click set of instructions that guide you to do exactly what should be done.

 

Simplified List of Actions that You Must Take To Install openSUSE (these simple instructions are not click-by-click)

First, get openSUSE by downloading an .iso file from a public download site.

You burn your .iso file (which is an .iso image) onto a writeable DVD.

You boot that disc on the computer onto which you want to put Linux.

You answer a series of questions and make a number of selections.

You eject that boot disc. You reboot.

Select openSUSE 13.1

Enter your username and password.

You download a lot of updates that should be applied to a newly installed version of openSUSE 13.1

Then you follow the instructions in the email you receive when you buy the game. These instructions tell you how to install the game.

 

Exact Instructions on Installing openSUSE as of September 14, 2014 (click-by-click)

 

Type in "openSUSE" in your favorite browser. If you're using a Google toolbar make sure you're looking on the Web.

 

Click on www.opensuse.org or just enter that as a web address in your toolbar.

 

Click on Get It

 

Select 64 bit PC (remember that the game only runs on a 64 bit processor). There's a set of installation instructions here you can click to read.

 

It will ask if you want to Open or Save openSUSE-13.1-DVD-x86_64.iso. Click Save.

 

A 6 megabit Internet connection will take 1 hr and 43 minutes to download this file.

 

The type of DVD you use to record the .iso needs to have a capacity to store a file as large as this .iso (It is a 4.5 gig file). I use a DVD+R double layer DVD that has 8.5 gigs of capacity.

 

When you insert your blank DVD in Windows it will ask if you want to burn it. It will offer to burn files to disc or to burn a DVD video disc. We will do neither. Hit the red X to cancel. If you burn your .iso file here and now you will get a disc that will not boot and which is useless for the purpose of installing openSUSE.

 

Click the Windows icon in the lower left. Click Computer. Go to the location of your downloads. If you haven't changed where that goes then under Computer it is in Downloads. When you have the directory of the downloads opened RIGHT click on openSUSE-13.1-DVD-x86_64

 

Select Burn Disc Image.

 

Select Verify if you want then click Burn.

 

Depending on the speed of your DVD drive, it should finish burning the disc in 15 minutes.

 

BEFORE YOU BOOT THAT DISC:

 

Back up your Windows system if possible. Don't leave your backup file on the Windows partition. Put it somewhere else. Somewhere online might be a good place to put your backup. In Windows determine the name/identifier of your Windows partition(s). In this document I will not try to tell you how to do these 2 things (out of scope).

 

If you are installing OpenSUSE to an i3-base laptop (even though I have elsewhere on this website recommended against that) my recommendation now is to not try to install OpenSUSE wirelessly. Instead, if you have a WiFi router that normally connects to your laptop under Windows (or any other OS) turn that off. If you have a WiFi router that you insert between your laptop and your real telephone company router then you may need to unpower that WiFI router and move your Internet connection cable from that WiFi router into the real router. All of my attempts to install Ubuntu and openSUSE wirelessly always ended in disaster. Use your wired link for all your communication needs during installation of either Ubuntu or openSUSE on an i3-based laptop. If your laptop is connected to a dock then I recommend physically disconnecting the cable that communicates with your dock during the duration of the Linux install.

 

AFTER YOU HAVE BACKED UP YOUR WINDOWS:

 

Put the boot disc in the tray, do whatever it takes to do that.

 

Power down your system (do not restart).

 

Power up your system (cold start).

 

As the system comes up press F2 (or whatever button your hardware responds to) to get the BIOS Setup screen.

 

After you are in BIOS Setup, if it isn't already true, change the boot mode so that the disc in the DVD drive is booted. I can't give click by click intructions here.

 

Select F10 then save to reboot.

 

After you see a Welcome screen, click Installation and hit return.

 

Click Next to agree to license.

 

Select New Installation.

 

Click on your location in the world (there's a clickable world map).

 

Hit Next.

 

Keep KDE as the Desktop. Click Next to get past Desktop Selection.

 

Be careful at the next screen. The installer probably will not try to get you to delete your Windows partition(s) but it might. Don't let it if you want to keep your Windows. If you have Windows and this is the 1st time you have put a Linux on that system then the installer will correctly and considerately inform you using red lettering that it will now shrink the Windows partition. This gives you confirmation now that it isn't about to erase your Windows. Now is when you need that list you made of the specifications for your Windows partitions. In general, the installer might try to format or delete those partitions. In all likelihood it will not. Usually the behavior of the openSUSE installer (and all other Linux installers) is to leave Windows alone and put your new installation into available, unused space. After you are satisfied that it isn't about to erase your Windows then hit Next. You get one more chance after this to back out, to abort and not touch your present system.

 

Set up your name, userid, and password(s). You probably should NOT use this password for system administrator. If you don't use this password for system administrator then the next screen will have you pick your root/super-user/system-administrator password.

 

Hit Next. Choose a good, hard root password. Hit Next.

 

This is now your last chance to back out. You should have backed up your Windows system to secure storage by this time. Hit Install again.

 

In about 15 minutes it will finish loading packages and will reboot. Since you didn't take your disc out before the reboot (Do not take it out before the reboot. I didn't while writing these instructions.) you now need to remove your disc.

 

You computer at this moment wants to keep that disc. Cut power (it'll never give it back to you unless you cut power).

 

Turn power on. As it boots, keep hitting the manual eject button of the DVD drive. It will eventually let you have the disc. Close the DVD door. Cut power. Turn power on.

 

Select openSUSE 13.1 from the GRUB2 boot loader.

 

The setup process will continue briefly. You don't have to enter anything. You know you've done a good install when you see the continuation of the setup process. Usually after this step of the setup finishes your computer has an active Internet connection.

 

Enter your username and password.

 

A window will pop up that wants to tell you about OpenSUSE. Click Continue. You can read all this information later.

 

On the screen there's a bar along the bottom. At the right on that bar is a little lady bug. Click it. It will say it is getting updates. This process will take a few minutes.

 

2 little windows will pop up. 1 will go away after a few seconds. The smaller one that goes away tells you to log-out. Don't do that. Ignore it. Click Install in the 2nd, larger window. If you delay a few seconds before clicking Install in the 2nd window, then yet another small window will pop up telling you that 5 updates are available for you to Review or Install. Ignore that. Don't click on that. You've already started installing those 5 updates. Starting to do it again before you've even finished doing it the 1st time is a bad, bad, bad idea.

 

Click Continue.

 

A window will pop up and scroll some text at you. Don't click on it.

 

Now your lady bug is red.

 

Click on the red lady bug.

 

Click Install.

 

At this point the installation process will come back and tell you that additional packages are required. It now wants 556 packages, not just 291. Click Continue.

 

And wait.

 

A little window will pop up telling you to restart. Don't do that. Don't click on it. Ignore it.

 

Click Continue.

 

A window will pop up that asks you to accept the flash player or gstreamer. Promptly click to accept either. Click to accept as soon as you see that window. Do NOT let that window just sit there during the remainder of the download.

 

Wait now.

 

Don't click on anything while you wait. Leave the red lady bug alone. Leave the spinning circle with a number in it alone. Don't let your screen lockup due to inactivity. You need to see what happens. Move the mouse occasionally.

 

Assuming a 6 megabit Internet connection, it takes 30 minutes before a window pops up. The next thing you see is the KDE Crash Handler reporting an error. Click Close. One of the 291 (or 556) packages you just downloaded had an error.

 

Restart your computer. You do this by moving the mouse cursor to the little round green SUSE icon at the bottom left. Click it once and don't move the cursor after you click. Move the cursor up and to the right so that the cursor is over the square red Leave icon. Don't try to click it. Move the cursor up (without leaving the white of that window) to the square red Shut down. Click THAT. A window pops up in the center of the screen. Click on the underscored T in that window (or wait 30 seconds).

 

About the present potential for a bad install in openSUSE: At the moment in openSUSE during the download process which brings a newly installed openSUSE up to snuff there are a number of opportunities to make a mistake and hence get a bad install. This extraordinarily rude behavior is not historically typical of the openSUSE download process. Usually it occurs without a hitch. I consider the openSUSE install process to be the best one, their Install/Add software function to be the best available among the Linuxes. I assume those responsible for openSUSE installs will notice these problems and fix them.

 


 

Estimate of Number of Sub-games Created by Options in WeaponizedChess

 

This not an exact estimate. The reason to create this rough estimate is not because an exact number is required. Three of the factors

 

have been simplified rendering the final count inexact. The formula for the number of sub-games within WeaponizedChess is:

 

N=(black-gov#)*(white-gov#)*(stealth#)*(submersion#)*(dominance#)*(XXX#)*(weaps/defs#)*(extra-defs#)*(reinforcements#)*(off-level#)*(homing#)*(max-stun#)*(stun-range#)*(flame-range#)*(stealth-detection#)*(submersion-detection#)*(competition#)*(doze-enemy#)*(move-range#)*(general-move#)*(king-restriction#)*(transport-restriction#)*(ground-ground#)(action-restriction#)*(rocket-rate#)*(stun-rate#)*(flame-rate#)*(conversion-rate#)*(game-type#)*(AI-difficulty#)

 

gov#'s:Number of different government types a player can choose. Each player can choose from 4.

 

stealth#:Settings to change stealth. There are 9 check boxes. If Never See or Always See are checked then the other checkboxes are meaningless. Any number of the 7 remaining checkboxes can be checked. 127 ways to configure these settings.

 

submersion#:Settings to change submersion visibility. There are 5 check boxes. Like stealth# if Never See or Always See are check then the other checkboxes are meaningless. Any number of the remaining 3 checkboxes can be checked. 7 ways to configure these settings.

 

dominance#:Whether a submerged submarine is shown according to stealth or submersion. 2 choices.

 

XXX#:Number of additional XXX boxes on the ground at game start. 3 choices

 

weaps/defs#:Amount of additional weapons and defenses on the ground at game start. 3 choices.

 

extra-defs#:Amount of additional defenses on the ground at game start: 3 choices.

 

reinforcements#:Number of reinforcements for each side. 3 choices.

 

off-level#:Whether the specialty rocket for a jet or sub can reach 1 square further. 2 choices.

 

homing#:Range that a torpedo or SAM can lock on to a target. 3 choices.

 

max-stun#:How long a stunned piece is stunned. 2 choices.

 

stun-range#:How far a stunner shoots. 7 choices.

 

flame-range#:How many squares(distance) a flamer affects: 2 choices.

 

stealth-detection#:Detection range of anti-stealth. 3 choices.

 

submersion-detection#:Detection range of torpedo launcher as it functions like a sensor. 3 choices.

 

competition#:Whether a game is competitive. 2 choices.

 

doze-enemy:Whether dozing can move an enemy. 2 choices.

 

move-range#:How far a tank, cleric, or queen can move. 81 choices (3 choices for a tank, cleric, 9 for the queen).

 

general-move#:General movement. 3 choices. This is one of the variables where I have simplified the calculation. If Chess of Mass Destruction is chosen then the user must choose 1 of 3 ways to move pawns. The affect of this pawn movement choice is not included in this calculation (is ignored). This makes this variable an underestimate.

 

king-restriction#:Restrictions on the king. 4 checkboxes. 15 choices.

 

transport-restriction#:Another source of inexactness in the calculation. This is a complicated variable. There are 11 checkboxes. I have pulled one checkbox from this factor (ground-to-ground-transport-only) and made it the next factor. I am leaving out 5 of these checkboxes from this calculation. That makes this factor an underestimate. There are 15 choices for this factor. This factor is concerned with various ways to restrict fires from pieces which are using transport articles.

 

ground-ground#:A transport article restriction. Whether or not a transport article can be fired by a piece that is in the air or at sub level which does have a transport article. The real-world analogy for this happening is for an airborne trooper using a parachute to jump out of an airplane or a combat diver using scuba to exit a submarine. 2 choices.

 

action-restriction#:Restrictions on actions. Another source of inexactness. This factor underestimates the true count. The inexactness comes from move-only. When the user chooses moveonly then the action restrictions menu is replaced by a menu of checkboxes to control move-only specific options. The move-only checkboxes has 2 independent checkboxes and 3 checkboxes such that only 1 of those 3 can be selected. This calculation ignores all these additional ways to configure a move-only game. There are 128 choices.

 

rocket-rate#;Recharge time for a rocket. 9 choices.

 

stun-rate#:Recharge time for a stunner. 9 choices.

 

flame-rate#:Recharge time for a flamer. 9 choices.

 

conversion-rate#:Recharge time for a conversions symbol. 9 choices.

 

game-type#:Whether this is a human versus human game or human versus AI. 2 choices.

 

AI-difficulty#:Difficulty level for the AI. 10 choices.

 

N=4*4*127*7*2*3*3*3*3*2*3*7*7*2*3*3*2*2*81*3*15*15*2*128*9*9*9*9*2*10=2032*7*2*3*3*3*3*2*3*7*7*2*3*3*2*2*81*3*15*15*2*128*9*9*9*9*2*10=2032*1134*2*3*7*7*2*3*3*2*2*81*3*15*15*2*128*9*9*9*9*2*10=2032*1134*294*2*3*3*2*2*81*3*15*15*2*128*9*9*9*9*2*10

 

=2032*1134*294*5832*3*15*15*2*128*9*9*9*9*2*10=2032*1134*294*5832*1350*128*9*9*9*9*2*10=2032*1134*294*5832*1350*839808*20=2304288*1714608*1133740900=2304288*1943921045606400=4479353938338280243200*20=89587078766765604864000

Feel free to check my math. This is very complicated and it would be easy to make a mistake. Remember, this is an underestimate, a lower bound.

To be fair, I am sure there are many games with a large degree of optionality. Is the number of their subgames equal to or greater than this game? I do not know. I have been gaming for several decades and I personally do not recall seeing a game with the optionality of WeaponizedChess. Perhaps a better comparison would be against other similar board games. 

Note that there are many starting boards included in WeaponizedChess. It is possible to consider each potential start board to be yet another "sub-game". There is a VERY large number of potential start boards. Each square may hold 2 ground pieces, 2 air pieces, 2 pieces at sublevel, 2 articles on the ground, 4 reinforcement pieces (2 black, 2 white). Each of the non-reinforcement pieces may be carrying up to 3 articles. There are 17 types of pieces that a player owns (can be either black or white) and 16 types of articles (weapons, defenses, transport articles, sensors). There are 100 squares. A regular chess board only has 64 squares and only has 6 types of pieces. Do you catch my drift?

I firmly believe that the $20 price for WeaponizedChess on Steam is very reasonable. The price per sub-game is 2.2324648013212661794517927186586e-22 dollars. This is not $2 per game. Notice the e (whose value is approximately 2.71828 ) raised to -22.